Coming Soon:

The following books by Robert Paul Wolff are available on Amazon.com as e-books: KANT'S THEORY OF MENTAL ACTIVITY, THE AUTONOMY OF REASON, UNDERSTANDING MARX, UNDERSTANDING RAWLS, THE POVERTY OF LIBERALISM, A LIFE IN THE ACADEMY, MONEYBAGS MUST BE SO LUCKY, AN INTRODUCTION TO THE USE OF FORMAL METHODS IN POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY.
Now Available: Volumes I, II, III, and IV of the Collected Published and Unpublished Papers.

NOW AVAILABLE ON YOUTUBE: LECTURES ON KANT'S CRITIQUE OF PURE REASON. To view the lectures, go to YouTube and search for "Robert Paul Wolff Kant." There they will be.

To contact me about organizing, email me at rpwolff750@gmail.com




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Wednesday, September 28, 2011

WHEW

The tutorial on the philosophy of David Hume is the ninth such multi-part series I have written, including the book-length tutorial on the use and abuse of formal methods in political philosophy, most of them in the past nine months. That is a good many words to send shimmering into cyberspace. Judging from the 2,500 previews and downloads these and other materials have garnered on box.net, there is some interest out there in reading what I have written, and for that I am very grateful.

I am not sure whether I shall attempt another tutorial, or what it might be on. For the moment, I am going to content myself with comments on the passing scene, and perhaps the odd book report. If anyone has an idea for another tutorial, I am always open to suggestions [it was, after all, a passing question in a comment that led to the tutorial on The Study of Society.]

As for the ceaseless Republican quest for a candidate, I cannot to better than to recommend Jon Stewart's hilarious treatment of the subject two nights ago. [I do not have the url, but you can all find it, if you have not already seen it.] I continue to hope for a third party split, although that will not, unfortunately, do much to overcome the enormous Republican majority in the House.

3 comments:

Amato said...

Professor,

I was wondering if you would be at all interested in giving your thoughts about the labor theory of value. Does this classical concept have anything to contribute to modern economic thought or should it be completely thrown out in favor of marginal utility? I know the concept is attractive for many of us because it puts on display what talk of input and output values obscures, namely, the exploitation of labor. But is someone completely out of their mind to think labor matters in any significant way toward price? And if not, what kind of argument could be made for that belief?

Robert Paul Wolff said...

Amato, I have done so at length in my tutorial, The Thought of Karl Marx, available by following the link at the top of the page to box.net. Also, I have written a book about that, UNDERSTANDING MARX, and also a number of journal articles, most important of which is "A Critique and Reinterpretation Marx's Labor Theory of Value." [I think that it the title] which appeared many years ago in a journal called PHILOSOPHY AND [PUBLIC AFFAIRS.

Take a look, if you are interested.

Amato said...

Thanks