Coming Soon:

The following books by Robert Paul Wolff are available on Amazon.com as e-books: KANT'S THEORY OF MENTAL ACTIVITY, THE AUTONOMY OF REASON, UNDERSTANDING MARX, UNDERSTANDING RAWLS, THE POVERTY OF LIBERALISM, A LIFE IN THE ACADEMY, MONEYBAGS MUST BE SO LUCKY, AN INTRODUCTION TO THE USE OF FORMAL METHODS IN POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY.
Now Available: Volumes I, II, III, and IV of the Collected Published and Unpublished Papers.

NOW AVAILABLE ON YOUTUBE: LECTURES ON KANT'S CRITIQUE OF PURE REASON. To view the lectures, go to YouTube and search for "Robert Paul Wolff Kant." There they will be.

To contact me about organizing, email me at rpwolff750@gmail.com




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Tuesday, December 6, 2011

ANOTHER TUTORIAL COMING UP

Judging from the statistical data that Google provides to those who use its blog-making apparatus, some of the folks who dropped in on this blog to read what I had to say about Newt Gingrich's doctoral dissertation have decided to visit the site again just to see whether there is anything else here to tempt their intellects. For them, I should explain that over the past year, from time to time, I have attempted what I call "tutorials" -- multi-part posts stretching over days, or even weeks, in which I systematically explain some subject in a more formal way than is typical of blogs. In this guise, I have discussed The Thought of Karl Marx, The Thought of Sigmund Freud, How to Study Society, The Use and Abuse of Formal Methods in Political Philosophy [that one became a short book], Herbert Marcuse's ONE DIMENSIONAL MAN, Max Weber's THE PROTESTANT ETHIC AND THE SPIRIT OF CAPITALISM, David Ricardo's PRINCIPLES OF POLITICAL ECONOMY AND TAXATION, and Ideological Critique [with special attention to Karl Mannheim's IDEOLOGY AND UTOPIA, among other works.] All of these, and much more besides, can be found on box.net by following the link at the top of this blog.

Tomorrow or the next day [depending on how the quail turn out], I shall do a very short tutorial -- a Micro-Tutorial, as it were -- on the great classic work of early Sociology, Emile Durkheim's SUICIDE. I have been on something of a mission to encourage my readers to re-acquaint themselves with the classics of what might be called the Heroic Age in the study of society -- the writings of Marx, Weber, Mannheim, and others. The Micro-Tutorial on Durkheim is part of that effort.

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