Coming Soon:

The following books by Robert Paul Wolff are available on Amazon.com as e-books: KANT'S THEORY OF MENTAL ACTIVITY, THE AUTONOMY OF REASON, UNDERSTANDING MARX, UNDERSTANDING RAWLS, THE POVERTY OF LIBERALISM, A LIFE IN THE ACADEMY, MONEYBAGS MUST BE SO LUCKY, AN INTRODUCTION TO THE USE OF FORMAL METHODS IN POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY.
Now Available: Volumes I, II, III, and IV of the Collected Published and Unpublished Papers.

NOW AVAILABLE ON YOUTUBE: LECTURES ON KANT'S CRITIQUE OF PURE REASON. To view the lectures, go to YouTube and search for "Robert Paul Wolff Kant." There they will be.

To contact me about organizing, email me at rpwolff750@gmail.com




Total Pageviews

Saturday, December 17, 2011

"APPRECIATIONS"

I have been rather taken with the idea of launching a series of what I will call Appreciations -- which is to say, not tutorials, or mini-tutorials, or even micro-tutorials, but rather subjective discussions of a number of boks that I have, over the years, found especially rewarding. There would be no suggestion of expertise on my part, simply a sharing with all of you of my appreciation of some texts. If that strikes you all as a good idea, I will undertake some of them when I return to Chapel Hill in a week's time.

Here are some of the titles that have occurred to me as candidates for the Appreciations:

Soren Kierkegaard, Philosophical Fragments
Erving Goffman, The Presentation of Self in Every-day Life
Paul Goodman, Empire City
C. I. Lewis, Mind and the World Order
Leon Litwack, Been in the Storm So Long
e. e. cummings, Collected Poems
Plato, Gorgias
William Golding, The Inheritors
Erich Auerbach, Mimesis

What do you think?

14 comments:

Unknown said...

Please do.

Chris said...

Why is Kierkegaard considered a philosopher and not a theologian, or Christian Apologist? Or, just, any other form of theistic writings (ramblings)?

Andrew Lionel Blais said...

It might also be interesting to hear about some of the books that have been admired by others, but you thought to be worthless, stupid, nonsense, or in some other way, vice ridden.

Brandon said...

It sounds like a good idea -- both Philosophical Fragments and Gorgias are underappreciated despite being a treasure-trove of ideas.

Michael said...

I like it. Mimesis is a personal favorite.

And Chris, since when did being a Christian exclude one from being a philosopher (said the atheist...)? I find Kierkegaard fascinating despite disagreeing with him, and I'm always shocked at how poorly some people think of him.

C Rossi said...

Goffman and the Gorgias ( an odd collocation, I suppose) would be appreciated. What about Sheldon Wolin's "Capitalism Incorporated" and David Harvey's "The Enigma of Capital," which are rather newish books. Do you know them?

Jerry Fresia said...

Great idea. A shot-gun of brilliance. What about the Manuscripts of 1844 and/or something that illuminates the creative process?

Robert Paul Wolff said...

I thought everyone had read the 1844 manuscripts!

Rob said...

This sounds great!!

Michael said...

Sounds wonderful. The only one of those works that I know well is Philosophical Fragments. I'd be curious to hear your take on it, and I'd also like to be introduced to the rest.

Chris said...

Everyone ought to read them Wolff!

Michael, misunderstanding me. I'm asking what makes him a philosopher, I'm not saying he can't be one. I'm ignorant of his work, and the little I have read, was entirely apologetic, and not philosophical.

Daniel said...

My vote is on Kierkegard!
He had, if I'm not mistaken, some quarrels with hegelianism which I'm sure can be interesting from a marxian point-of-view.

James said...

I would also have to vote for Kierkegaard. The Philosophical Fragments and the Concluding Unscientific Postscript are his most philosophical. Chapter 3 of the Fragments is quite intriguing to me.

Chris, Kierkegaard is considered a philosopher because his early writings contain influential and profound philosophical thought. The Fragments and the Postscript alone guarantee his reputation in philosophy is assured.

Kierkegaard is also considered a theologian for the purposes of theology when one considers his late writings, like The Attack Upon Christendom, Works of Love, Practice in Christianity and the Discourses. These works alone guarantee his reputation in theology is assured.

Personally, I find Kierkegaard's works to be very fascinating. And while I don't believe in God, I definitely respect Kierkegaard's own belief to do so.

adamvs said...

Kierkegaarde would be welcome, as would Goffman.Actually, any of them