Coming Soon:

The following books by Robert Paul Wolff are available on Amazon.com as e-books: KANT'S THEORY OF MENTAL ACTIVITY, THE AUTONOMY OF REASON, UNDERSTANDING MARX, UNDERSTANDING RAWLS, THE POVERTY OF LIBERALISM, A LIFE IN THE ACADEMY, MONEYBAGS MUST BE SO LUCKY, AN INTRODUCTION TO THE USE OF FORMAL METHODS IN POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY.
Now Available: Volumes I, II, III, and IV of the Collected Published and Unpublished Papers.

NOW AVAILABLE ON YOUTUBE: LECTURES ON KANT'S CRITIQUE OF PURE REASON. To view the lectures, go to YouTube and search for "Robert Paul Wolff Kant." There they will be.

To contact me about organizing, email me at rpwolff750@gmail.com




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Wednesday, December 14, 2011

A TRIUMPH

Yesterday was a day of strange weather contrasts in Paris. It started when Susie and I ventured out to the open air market, under blue skies, only to be pelted by rain as I shopped for the dinner meal. I quickly collected up some carrots, mushrooms, several onions, some tomatoes, and 300 grams of "crevettes rose," large, reddish shrimp complete with heads and eyes. Later on, when the weather seemed to have cleared definitively, we undertook a long walk to the Musee Carnavalet in the 3rd arrondissement, a museum devoted to the history of Paris. On the way, we suddenly found ourselves in a hail storm, and were forced to stop into a restaurant on the Ile St. Louis for crepes sucre and tarte Tatin.

By the time we returned home, we were somewhat battered, but unbowed. I then put together a crevette stew, incorporating the carrots, mushrooms, and onions and flavored with curry powder and some chicken buillion. I say with no tinge of false modesty that it was fantastic! One of my most successful creations.

This evening, I shall rest on my laurels and just whip up a simple dinner of fresh tuna and sauteed zucchini, washed down with a Sauterne blanc for Susie and a Gigondas for me. Having brought my Durkheim micro-tutorial to a close today, I shall turn my attention tomorrow to the next challenge. All suggestions are gratefully received.

6 comments:

High Arka said...

The truth hurts. Try something on the nature of truth!

Jim said...

Professor Wolff –

Just received news here that George Whitman, owner of Shakespeare and Co., passed away at age 98. I was wondering what the reaction was in Paris.

-- Jim

C Rossi said...

I would very much like to read your thoughts on Erving Goffman. His "Presentation of Self in Everyday Life" is I think in the great tradition of Marx and Durkheim in the study of social life. Enjoy the rest of your stay in Paris; your posts from Paris have stimulated the stomach as well as the brain. Salut.

ajrosa said...

Hi Bob,

I have no recipes to share, but I do occasionally read pieces in the following blog:

http://networkedblogs.com/rzj9B

Often mentions some interesting tidbits about Paris Noir that might serve as a nice excursion for both you and Susie.

Andrew

Andrew Lionel Blais said...

Have any views on the Liar Paradox?

Michael said...

I hate to add another tutorial suggestion to the mix, but what about something on W.E.B. du Bois? I've read The Souls of Black Folks, but nothing else, and I'd love to get a bigger-picture view of his work.

The other suggestions concern topics with which I'm more familiar (I am a logician, after all), so I can offer some reading tips.

Arka: Concerning truth, I'd recommend the anthology from Simon Blackburn and Keith Smith entitled Truth (sensibly enough). It was published by Oxford UP in 1999 and has a great collection of classic and contemporary articles on the notion of truth.

Andrew, do you know Graham Priest's work. As of late, he's become one of the world's leading experts on the Liar Paradox, in part because he thinks it shows that there are true contradictions. I don't buy that ultimate conclusion, but he's a hell of a philosopher and a no-nonsense logician. My favorite book of his is In Contradiction (2nd ed., Oxford UP, 2006), but if the Liar Paradox is your main focus, I'd recommend Doubt Truth to Be a Liar (Oxford, 2006) -- which I think is one of the all-time great titles for a philosophical work.

Incidentally, I realized that there are two distinct Michaels (and one Mike) posting regularly here. I'm going to change my tag to Michael K. from here on out.

-Michael K.