Coming Soon:

The following books by Robert Paul Wolff are available on Amazon.com as e-books: KANT'S THEORY OF MENTAL ACTIVITY, THE AUTONOMY OF REASON, UNDERSTANDING MARX, UNDERSTANDING RAWLS, THE POVERTY OF LIBERALISM, A LIFE IN THE ACADEMY, MONEYBAGS MUST BE SO LUCKY, AN INTRODUCTION TO THE USE OF FORMAL METHODS IN POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY.
Now Available: Volumes I, II, III, and IV of the Collected Published and Unpublished Papers.

NOW AVAILABLE ON YOUTUBE: LECTURES ON KANT'S CRITIQUE OF PURE REASON. To view the lectures, go to YouTube and search for "Robert Paul Wolff Kant." There they will be.

To contact me about organizing, email me at rpwolff750@gmail.com




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Thursday, December 13, 2012

CULINARY ADVENTURES

Ever since Susie and I took the plunge and bought our Paris apartment eight years ago, I have been the cook.  Over the years, I have developed a small repertory of dishes of which I am inordinately proud, as only a mediocre amateur chef can be -- grilled quail, hazelnut encrusted rabbit, five spices duck legs, coquilles St. Jacques, dorade royale [a lovely white fish], tuna, swordfish, paupiettes provencale [a cheat, these, inasmuch as they are delicious little concoctions of turkey, bacon, and farci already prepared by the local butcher].  Today, urged on by Susie, who in the day was truly a great cordon bleu cook, I bought skate at the market [or "raie,"as it is called in France.]  Skate is a really scary looking thing, lying there at the fishmonger's stall as though it was ready to fly into your boat and bite you.  I found a fairly simple recipe online, and tomorrow night I shall try it.  Who knows, if this works, I might even try my hand at escargots!

4 comments:

P. J. Grath said...

Soon we may have to call you Madame Maigret.

Charles said...

Hey! You gotta post the recipes!

Robert Paul Wolff said...

The skate recipe is just something I found on he web. Here is the url:

http://fishcooking.about.com/od/fishfilletrecipe1/r/skate_bbutter.htm

As for the other recipes,I can post those if anyone actually cares.

David Auerbach said...

Happy boning.
When I lived in Paris (on rue Paul Bert, in the fabulous 11th) there was in the nearby covered market (on of the few left--Marché d'Aligre)a woman who specialized in offal. Her paupiettes with sweetbreads were wonderful.
That market also produced a genuine Proustian moment; the chicken purveyor had asked if I wanted my chicken "preparé" (=gutted, headed, and footed (defeeted?)), "oui", I said, as I glanced over at the cheese stand. Moments later I was transported back to the Bronx circa 1955. The chicken monger was singeing the pin feathers over a bunsen burner, producing the well-remembered odor as my mother was similarly employed over the open gas burner of our stove; she having picked out a live chicken at Bathgate market and which, after the ministrations of the lowly flicker at the market, still needed some work.