Coming Soon:

The following books by Robert Paul Wolff are available on Amazon.com as e-books: KANT'S THEORY OF MENTAL ACTIVITY, THE AUTONOMY OF REASON, UNDERSTANDING MARX, UNDERSTANDING RAWLS, THE POVERTY OF LIBERALISM, A LIFE IN THE ACADEMY, MONEYBAGS MUST BE SO LUCKY, AN INTRODUCTION TO THE USE OF FORMAL METHODS IN POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY.
Now Available: Volumes I, II, III, and IV of the Collected Published and Unpublished Papers.

NOW AVAILABLE ON YOUTUBE: LECTURES ON KANT'S CRITIQUE OF PURE REASON. To view the lectures, go to YouTube and search for "Robert Paul Wolff Kant." There they will be.

To contact me about organizing, email me at rpwolff750@gmail.com




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Friday, July 18, 2014

THIS AND THAT

1.  I may have seen an indication this morning during my walk of a seismic shift in French culture.  When I passed the row of Batobuses anchored for the night on the shores of the Seine, I noticed that the Jean Gabin and the Yves Montand had been promoted from the rear to the front of the row.  If a Simone Signoret shows up, I will know that I am on to something.

2.  Magpie posts a long comment today [or last night], reacting to Chris Langton's critique of something I wrote two years ago.  Out of curiosity, I went back and read the original post, which was an essay I had actually written long ago called "A Critique of Keynesian Economics."  I found my essay quite interesting.  I also had absolutely no recollection of ever having written it.  There are times when I think I am losing it.

2 comments:

Magpie said...

While I am much less sanguine about central planning, I also found your essay interesting and quite timely, too, as I have been thinking long and hard about Keynesianism and Marxism.

To have some idea of its context I'd like to ask three questions, if I may.

(1) That text was a lecture, or a speech. Am I right?

(2) I suppose it was written before the fall of the Soviet empire, no? Any approximate date?

(3) You write (page 9):

"Faced with the intrusion of subjective non-rational elements into the process of
economic choice and decision, **post-Keynesian** economists are forced to alter fundamentally
the way in which they seek to understand a capitalist economy".

What is the precise meaning intended to "post-Keynesian" in that sentence?

I ask this because, nowadays, the set of Keynesian economists is divided on mutually exclusive, and generally feuding, subsets (perhaps sub-sects is more appropriate), and the members of one of the subsets identify themselves as "post-Keynesians", as distinct from the "New Keynesians", or the "Neo-Classicals" (there may be other brands, with much smaller market shares).

Jerry Fresia said...

"I found my essay quite interesting. I also had absolutely no recollection of ever having written it. There are times when I think I am losing it."

There is a wonderful story, perhaps apocryphal, about Schubert that sheds light on your sense of "losing it." Schubert, so lost in the process of composing, often had no recollection of having written various pieces. So students of his, as the story goes, pulled together a score he had written, set him down, and performed the piece for him. Upon hearing the piece performed, Schubert responded, "My that is lovely. Who wrote it?" Lost in the process, it seems to me, is where one ought to be.