Coming Soon:

The following books by Robert Paul Wolff are available on Amazon.com as e-books: KANT'S THEORY OF MENTAL ACTIVITY, THE AUTONOMY OF REASON, UNDERSTANDING MARX, UNDERSTANDING RAWLS, THE POVERTY OF LIBERALISM, A LIFE IN THE ACADEMY, MONEYBAGS MUST BE SO LUCKY, AN INTRODUCTION TO THE USE OF FORMAL METHODS IN POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY.
Now Available: Volumes I, II, III, and IV of the Collected Published and Unpublished Papers.

NOW AVAILABLE ON YOUTUBE: LECTURES ON KANT'S CRITIQUE OF PURE REASON. To view the lectures, go to YouTube and search for "Robert Paul Wolff Kant." There they will be.

To contact me about organizing, email me at rpwolff750@gmail.com




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Wednesday, February 4, 2015

TEACHING UPDATE

In a little while, I shall go to UNC to give the second of two classes on the mathematical reconstruction of the classical Political Economy tradition to which Marx was reacting in Capital.  Then, after returning from a weekend in San Francisco, where I will play very, very elementary violin-viola duets with my grandson, Samuel, who has just starting "taking violin," I will, on February 11th, five weeks after beginning the course, finally turn the cover of Capital to the first page and read the famous opening words:  "The wealth of those societies in which the capitalist mode of production prevails presents itself as 'an immense accumulation of commodities,' its unit being a single commodity.  Our analysis must therefore begin with the analysis of a commodity."  [Marx is quoting himself!]

Thus will I inaugurate five hours of intense dissection of Chapter One, grounded in, among other things, a literary analysis of ironic discourse and its relationship to the distinction between appearance and reality.  The students, having been guided for several weeks by my book, Understanding Marx, will now read Moneybags Must Be So Lucky as they tackle the baffling and highly inflected language of the first several hundred pages of Capital.

Only the Critique of Pure Reason has demanded as much from me as Capital does.  It is now fifty-five years since I first taught the Critique and I do not think I have poured so much of myself into a course since then.  I can only hope that the students are finding the course as rewarding to take as I am finding it to teach.

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