Coming Soon:

The following books by Robert Paul Wolff are available on Amazon.com as e-books: KANT'S THEORY OF MENTAL ACTIVITY, THE AUTONOMY OF REASON, UNDERSTANDING MARX, UNDERSTANDING RAWLS, THE POVERTY OF LIBERALISM, A LIFE IN THE ACADEMY, MONEYBAGS MUST BE SO LUCKY, AN INTRODUCTION TO THE USE OF FORMAL METHODS IN POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY.
Now Available: Volumes I, II, III, and IV of the Collected Published and Unpublished Papers.

NOW AVAILABLE ON YOUTUBE: LECTURES ON KANT'S CRITIQUE OF PURE REASON. To view the lectures, go to YouTube and search for "Robert Paul Wolff Kant." There they will be.

To contact me about organizing, email me at rpwolff750@gmail.com




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Monday, August 15, 2016

ADVERTISEMENTS FOR MYSELF

Some of you [we few, we happy few] have been readers of this blog almost from its inception, but most of you have joined me somewhere along the way.  I frequently refer the materials “archived at box.net, accessible via the link at the top of the page,” but my guess is that many of you have not been moved to check out that archive.  The purpose of this post is to alert you to what you have been missing.

Shortly after I began blogging, I wrote, and posted serially, an extremely long 260,000 word Memoir, or Autobiography.  Divided into three volumes, it begins with my memories of the Sunnyside Progressive School in 1936 and ends with my retirement and move with my wife to North Carolina in 2008.  As it unfolded day by day, the memoir achieved a certain succes de scandale in the academic community when Brian Leiter’s attention was caught by my gossip about prominent university Philosophy departments.  All three volumes of the Memoir are available on box.net.

While I was writing and posting the memoir, I also wrote and posted seriatim a short book entitled The Use and Abuse of Formal Methods in Political Philosophy, in which I give a rigorous introduction to Rational Choice Theory, Collective Choice Theory, and Game Theory, with applications.  This too is available on box.net.

When the Memoir had concluded, my fingers still itched to write, so I conceived the idea of writing several lengthy essays or monographs, which I called Tutorials, each in daily segments to be posted on this blog.  The first was entitled The Thought of Karl Marx, and it ran some 30,000 words.  This was followed by The Thought of Sigmund Freud, 20,000 words, The Philosophy of David Hume, 27,500 words, an Introduction to the Critique of Pure Reason, 30,000 words, and Afro-American Studies, 24,500 words.  All are available on box.net

By now, I was addicted to the charms of my own words, and cast about for other topics to address.  I decided to write several shorter essays, which I called Mini-Tutorials.  These included “The Study of Society” [which actually began as a response to a commenter who described herself as “Luke’s Mom”], “Ricardo’s Principles,” “One-Dimensional Man,” “Durkheim’s Suicide,” and “Plato’s Gorgias.”  Finally, I added several “Appreciations,” discussions [of books] so brief they did not rise to the level of mini-tutorials.

All of this is available on box.net, together with a number of my published and unpublished essays on a variety of topics, and four annual collections of lesser blog posts which I call “Pebbles from The Philosopher’s Stone.”


This material has not gone completely unnoticed.  Box.net tells me that the monograph on the thought of Karl Marx has been accessed 1232 times, the introduction to the Critique 809 times, and even my little satirical review of Allan Bloom’s The Closing of the American Mind has had 608 visitors.  But if any of the above piques your curiosity, I invite you to use the link at the top of this page and browse for a bit.  It is all open source, so use it or abuse it as you see fit.

8 comments:

s. wallerstein said...

I was glancing at your memoirs. Do you recall a guy called Robert Finkel, a philosophy student at Columbia during the early and mid 60's, a really brilliant guy, but very rebellious and "looking for something", as people used to say then? He was a friend of mine and I lost track of him. I'm not sure if he ever finished college, but I tracked him down through Google. He had just died and I found that he had spent most of his adult life as paramedic in some small town in New England (I forget the state) and was considered a kind of village saint. That seemed so right to me, considering what a "conflictive" young man he was. He redeemed himself as a paramedic.

Robert Paul Wolff said...

The name does not ring abell, as they say, but I got there in '64, so maybe we missed one another. Let me check my records and see whether he took a course with me.

s. wallerstein said...

Bob was still there in 1964 and I know that he was a "friend" of Nagel. Bob was ultra-brilliant, but difficult, so to speak....

Robert Paul Wolff said...

nope, he did not take a course with me at Columbia

s. wallerstein said...

Ok. Thanks for looking. Be well.

Charles Pigden said...

Dear Professor Wolff,
How about stringing together your memoirs as one big searchable pdf (or perhaps three big searchable pdfs)? That way those of us with an interest in in the history of twentieth century philosophy (aka academic gossip) could do word-searches.
Regards
Charles Pigden

Robert Paul Wolff said...

Charles Pigden, it is on box.net under the title "Total Memoir in One File"

s. wallerstein said...

Off topic, but a much more nuanced view of how Putin sees the U.S. election and how he is playing is hand than you are ever going to see in the New York Times:

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/aug/16/vladmir-putin-donald-trump-ties-russia-us-election