Coming Soon:

The following books by Robert Paul Wolff are available on Amazon.com as e-books: KANT'S THEORY OF MENTAL ACTIVITY, THE AUTONOMY OF REASON, UNDERSTANDING MARX, UNDERSTANDING RAWLS, THE POVERTY OF LIBERALISM, A LIFE IN THE ACADEMY, MONEYBAGS MUST BE SO LUCKY, AN INTRODUCTION TO THE USE OF FORMAL METHODS IN POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY.
Now Available: Volumes I, II, III, and IV of the Collected Published and Unpublished Papers.

NOW AVAILABLE ON YOUTUBE: LECTURES ON KANT'S CRITIQUE OF PURE REASON. To view the lectures, go to YouTube and search for "Robert Paul Wolff Kant." There they will be.

To contact me about organizing, email me at rpwolff750@gmail.com




Total Pageviews

Saturday, April 29, 2017

A REPLYTO AN OLD QUESTION

Someone, I cannot now find the question, asked me on this blog how many books I have in my personal library.  The answer is very few, perhaps 1500-1600, or so, down-sized from when I lived in Massachusetts.  That is a very small library for a professor my age.  On the other hand, I have read almost all of them.  I have them organized in five groups, each separately alphabetized:  General, Economics, Marx, Kant, and Afro-American Studies.  There is also a small Mathematics section, and of course all the music I acquired during my viola study and quartet playing.  Oh, and also a section devoted to various editions of the books I have published or in which I have published.  That is reasonably large.

2 comments:

Chris said...

This sums of the state of american literacy (reading the comments is depressing):

https://www.uhaul.com/MovingSupplies/Boxes/Standard-Sized-Moving-Boxes/Book-Box?id=3161

By comparison you have the library of Alexandria!

Do you have a separate area for novels and fiction? You've often commented how you read Jane Austen and also spy novels/thrillers.

David Auerbach said...

But where are the cookbooks? (I recently downsized and gave away 500+ cook/food books, leaving about as many. It was instructive). On the other hand, I have a first-edition of R. Smullyan's Theory of Formal Systems in its brilliant princeton orange.