Coming Soon:

The following books by Robert Paul Wolff are available on Amazon.com as e-books: KANT'S THEORY OF MENTAL ACTIVITY, THE AUTONOMY OF REASON, UNDERSTANDING MARX, UNDERSTANDING RAWLS, THE POVERTY OF LIBERALISM, A LIFE IN THE ACADEMY, MONEYBAGS MUST BE SO LUCKY, AN INTRODUCTION TO THE USE OF FORMAL METHODS IN POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY.
Now Available: Volumes I, II, III, and IV of the Collected Published and Unpublished Papers.

NOW AVAILABLE ON YOUTUBE: LECTURES ON KANT'S CRITIQUE OF PURE REASON. To view the lectures, go to YouTube and search for "Robert Paul Wolff Kant." There they will be.

To contact me about organizing, email me at rpwolff750@gmail.com




Total Pageviews

Monday, April 10, 2017

MYTHOLOGICAL PERAMBULATIONS

At 5:45 a.m., as I took my morning walk, I spent a few moments reminding myself of the myth of Oedipus in preparation for this afternoon's Freud lecture.  Low in the sky was Selene, the Greek moon goddess, full and resplendent, accompanied by her handmaiden Venus, the Morning Star.  It was a propitious omen.

3 comments:

David Auerbach said...

yes, but what did the entrails say?

NickPappas said...

Moments like that make life seem charmed.

And here's something extra-Freudian about Sophocles. In the original story (as we find it, and as Sophocles would have found it, in Odysseus's voyage to the underworld in the Odyssey), Oedipus kills his father and marries his mother, but then "the gods make it known." Sophocles rearranges things so that Oedipus himself unearths the secret -- as if he always slightly knew it. For Homer, it just happened. For Sophocles, the real story is how Oedipus came to discover the fact. Freud is entitled to say: "Why are you so shocked at what I'm saying? Read Sophocles!"

David Auerbach said...

When I would teach the logical theory of relations and introduce the notions of symmetry, reflexivity and transitivity, after a little drilling on easy examples, I would then ask the class if *_parent of_* was transitive, intransitive or non-transitive. They would always go for intransitive until I dropped enough hints about Greek plays maybe having to go as far as asking if the name 'Jocasta' rings a bell...