Coming Soon:

The following books by Robert Paul Wolff are available on Amazon.com as e-books: KANT'S THEORY OF MENTAL ACTIVITY, THE AUTONOMY OF REASON, UNDERSTANDING MARX, UNDERSTANDING RAWLS, THE POVERTY OF LIBERALISM, A LIFE IN THE ACADEMY, MONEYBAGS MUST BE SO LUCKY, AN INTRODUCTION TO THE USE OF FORMAL METHODS IN POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY.
Now Available: Volumes I, II, III, and IV of the Collected Published and Unpublished Papers.

NOW AVAILABLE ON YOUTUBE: LECTURES ON KANT'S CRITIQUE OF PURE REASON. To view the lectures, go to YouTube and search for "Robert Paul Wolff Kant." There they will be.

To contact me about organizing, email me at rpwolff750@gmail.com




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Sunday, February 16, 2014

CROWD SOURCING WORKS

Thank you all.  It is indeed H. L. Hunt.

Here is an interesting question that I am sure many have written about:  I know a number of things that I cannot at the moment recall, but with enough effort I can retrieve many of them from my memory.  For example, sometimes I cannot recall Donald Sutherland's name even though I can tell you the movies he was in and what he looks like.  There are also countless things I do not know and perhaps have never known that I can retrieve from Google in much less time than it takes me to recall one of the things I do know, such as, say, the capital of South Dakota.  Why should I not consider that vast store of information part of what I know? 

2 comments:

Andres said...

David Chalmers (and others) call this view 'the extended mind'. They defend this thesis in a number of papers. Here's in one of them: http://consc.net/papers/extended.html

Robert Paul Wolff said...

Thank you, Andres. I will take a look at it. I was certain it was an idea that had been much discussed.