Coming Soon:

The following books by Robert Paul Wolff are available on Amazon.com as e-books: KANT'S THEORY OF MENTAL ACTIVITY, THE AUTONOMY OF REASON, UNDERSTANDING MARX, UNDERSTANDING RAWLS, THE POVERTY OF LIBERALISM, A LIFE IN THE ACADEMY, MONEYBAGS MUST BE SO LUCKY, AN INTRODUCTION TO THE USE OF FORMAL METHODS IN POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY.
Now Available: Volumes I, II, III, and IV of the Collected Published and Unpublished Papers.

NOW AVAILABLE ON YOUTUBE: LECTURES ON KANT'S CRITIQUE OF PURE REASON. To view the lectures, go to YouTube and search for "Robert Paul Wolff Kant." There they will be.

To contact me about organizing, email me at rpwolff750@gmail.com




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Saturday, March 26, 2016

DOWN MEMORY LANE

Forty-seven years ago, when my first wife and I were both in analysis and I was scrambling to pay the bills, a publisher asked me to edit a little paperback, to be called "Ten Great Works of Philosophy," anthologizing a selection of texts all in the public domain [no permission fees].  I gave my standard answer:  "What is the advance?"  "A thousand on signing and a thousand on submission," they replied.  So of course I agreed.  As I recall, I did the job so fast that before they could cut me the check for signing I handed in the finished manuscript.

Today, a royalty check arrived, for $118.50  -- not exactly fat city, but large enough to deposit on Monday without embarrassment.  

When I entered the data in my royalty spreadsheet, I saw that the book has now sold 196,215 copies.  The royalties have always been peanuts.  I think in fifty-seven years the book has earned me about $22,000, or 11 cents a copy.

There is something oddly comforting about knowing that deep down, I am just a hack.

2 comments:

Michael Llenos said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Michael Llenos said...

Dr. Wolff,
Sorry for putting my spiel against Kant on your website. I just have a strong inclination about Kant being wrong. And no I do not think I am as brave or smart as Julius Caesar. I got the Anti-Cato title idea from Anthony Everitt's biography on Cicero (2001).