Coming Soon:

The following books by Robert Paul Wolff are available on Amazon.com as e-books: KANT'S THEORY OF MENTAL ACTIVITY, THE AUTONOMY OF REASON, UNDERSTANDING MARX, UNDERSTANDING RAWLS, THE POVERTY OF LIBERALISM, A LIFE IN THE ACADEMY, MONEYBAGS MUST BE SO LUCKY, AN INTRODUCTION TO THE USE OF FORMAL METHODS IN POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY.
Now Available: Volumes I, II, III, and IV of the Collected Published and Unpublished Papers.

NOW AVAILABLE ON YOUTUBE: LECTURES ON KANT'S CRITIQUE OF PURE REASON. To view the lectures, go to YouTube and search for "Robert Paul Wolff Kant." There they will be.

NOW AVAILABLE ON YOUTUBE: LECTURES ON THE THOUGHT OF KARL MARX. To view the lectures, go to YouTube and search for Robert Paul Wolff Marx."




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Tuesday, March 20, 2018

NUMBER SIX!

Here it is, the sixth lecture on Marx.  No sooner is it posted than I must get to work on lecture seven.  A bloviator's work is never done.

2 comments:

s. wallerstein said...

Are you so sure that a craftsman always feels good about working?

I'm not talking about the hippie weaver you refer to and who weaves because they want to weave, but the weaver who weaves because they need to earn money or to trade their wares in order to eat. There's must be days when the weaver has to weave in order to put bread on their table and their back hurts and they'd rather be sleeping or conversing with friends or drinking beer or making love.

Work in general is a drag. Now that may not be true for a philosopher who loves Marx and loves explaining Marx to others, but for example, I've taught English as a foreign language (which is a lot easier on the back than weaving) and it's a drag facing a room of
hostile or apathetic teenagers who for the most part see the teacher as their enemy.

I think that Marxism in general romanticizes work.

Anonymous said...

Folks should have a listen to Leiter's discussion of Marx on the Elucidations podcast. He is impressively concise, nuanced but contained, and he makes some bracing observations about the relevance of Marx and his thought to our present situation. Recommended!